Cinque Terre – Tips and Recommendations

Back at the end of August, I unexpectedly flew to Italy and was able to spend three and a half days in Cinque Terre. It was one of my favorite trips ever, and below you can find the tips and tricks I wish I had known before going!

Cinque Terre is incredibly easy to get to from Pisa. You just take the train to La Spezia, where you can change to the train line that connects the 5 towns. In La Spezia buy train passes for the days you’ll be in Cinque Terre, which makes exploring all the towns super simple. The passes are 13 euros for one day, or 23 for two, and include unlimited access to the trains, hiking trails, and (spotty) wifi. The trains run from Levanto to La Spezia and stop at each of the five towns along the way.

Because I booked so late, my options for staying in/around Cinque Terre were quite limited. Nearly all the hostels were completely booked, even in the surrounding towns. I booked the only place available, Affittacamere Patrizia. It had some reviews that made me hesitate, but lacking other options I didn’t have much of a choice. Though it ended up being expensive, it worked out because had I booked earlier I would have tried to save money by staying in La Spezia or Levanto, and the quiet early mornings and late evenings, before the crush of tourists arrived, ended up being the most magical hours of the trip. The place was strange—I booked two nights and I stayed in separate buildings each night—a bit annoying because I had to respect check in/out times, and arrange to pick up/drop off my bag around their front desk opening hours. The first night I was literally sleeping in the front room—there were three bedrooms and a bathroom off where I was staying, and the front door opened to my bed and one other. The second night I was in a new house, staying on the top floor in the kitchen, but it had a great balcony and it was the only bed in the room, so it was nearly like having my own apartment. If I had more notice I’m not sure I’d stay there again, but I wouldn’t hesitate to return in a pinch. However you can learn from me and book early, and plan on staying in one of the towns to get the full experience. I’d recommend Riomaggiore, Coniglia, or Vernazza.


Riomaggiore was the quietest of the towns, and it was quite small. The food was delicious and the place was stunning, probably the most beautiful of them all—this is where I stayed and I’d definitely be happy staying there again. There’s less to do than the other towns, but as a base it’s pretty perfect. It’s built on a giant hill, so be prepared for a steep incline to get anywhere! It had a good amount of rocks to use as a mini beach, and a few places to jump in as well. (Mom, that’s for you!)


Manarola felt quite young and hip. It was lively and had a fun vibe. The harbour had a place where it was possible to jump off, so people who were braver than I dove off the rocks. I think a lot of people list this as their favourite town, and while it was up there for me, it wasn’t the top of my list.


All the guides I read suggested skipping Corniglia if you were short on time, and I considered it. I’m so happy I didn’t! It was quite unlike the other towns—it’s high above sea level and there’s no beach access. However that gives it really nice views, and the town felt a bit more chilled and artistic. There were some cute shops, unique looking bars and coffee shops, and it had more shade than the other towns. If it wasn’t such a hike to the train and/or nearby towns, I’d consider staying here. I hiked in from Manarola and out to Vernazza, and both hikes were incredible but very hard—and the walk up to the town from the train was stairs on stairs on stairs. Be prepared for a work out, no matter how you arrive.


I loved Vernazza. It had two beaches, one hidden through a rock tunnel that was created after a huge rock slide, and another spot along the harbor next to the cliff that leads to Monterosso. The food was good, the gelato better, and I spent more time here than anyway other town.


Honestly, Monterosso wasn’t my favorite. I didn’t go until my last day, and by then was already so in love with the other four towns, I’m not sure I gave it a fair shot. I spent the least time here, and it felt much more city-like than the others. It’s the only one that has a sand beach (I HATE sand, but maybe this is a selling point for someone else), and it was set up more like a resort, which is also not my vibe. It looked big and like there would be some great shopping, so maybe spend a bit more time there than I did.


You only need to go to one place, and that’s Gelarteria Vernazza. I tried the others, and none came close.


I did some real searching, but didn’t find anything other than pastries and yogurt as breakfast options. Eggs were not a thing as far as I could tell—if someone finds them please let me know in case I ever go back!


I had dinner both nights in Riomaggiore, which was great. All the food I had there was delicious, and recommend Trattoria la Grotta and Pizzeria Da Mam’angel if you’re looking for good food that isn’t going to break the bank.


I know gelato technically is dessert (though I utilized it as a lunch), but Monterosso is also well known for Torta Monterossina Ricetta, which I tried at Pasticceria Laura and it was SO good. It was the best part of the town for me.


Bring books! I only brought one (The Story of the Lost Child, by Elena Ferrante, which I highly recommend), and there was so much time for reading I blew through it, and struggle to find other English books available in the towns.


I hiked Coniglia to Vernazza and Monterosso to Vernazza. They were fantastic, and if you’re in any kind of shape I highly recommend them and any other hikes that are open. They had stunning views and were a great work out—honestly both were much harder than I anticipated, and I planned poorly and did the first one right at noon, when the sun was directly overhead. Plan to go earlier in the morning, or later in the afternoon, bring a lot of water, maybe a snack, and definitely be prepared to sweat. Luckily there are beaches at either end with some seriously inviting water, and there is a cafe high in the cliffs at the midpoint of the Coniglia/Vernazza hike.


One of my favorite things to do when I visit a place is collect some kind of art, so I can bring a piece home with me. There was a really cute art store in Vernazza owned by Antonio Greco where he shows his work. I got two prints there, which make me insanely happy whenever I see them. One was by Antonio, and the other was the Imago Cinque Terre poster. I get compliments on them all the time. They were affordable as well!

In 21 days…

I’ll be in Portland! I found out I was going to have a few days off the week before Gareth gets into town. Which was kind of the worst timing ever and felt a little like the universe was mocking me. He’s always worked when I’ve been in London, but he has much more sociable hours (if I’m also not working–if we were both working with his crazy schedule, we would literally never see each other). But he’s come to the states three times, once in May of 2015 after my job had ended, once to LA before I found a new job (during the dark months of unemployment), and once over Christmas (which I guess was still during the dark months, but I could pretend it was just the holidays). Never when I’ve been working. And I work like 12 hour days, which is going to feel like pure hell when I know he’s just down the street and I’m sitting in my office, trying not to feel like I’m wasting his whole trip working.

BUT! The extra days off. Before he was set to come. Well, he changed his plane ticket–only by a day, because all the flights were booked before then–but then we suddenly had a long weekend together. So we did the only rational thing–immediately booked tickets to go on what is shockingly our first proper trip away.

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MV

We’ve spent time in Cornwall with G’s family, gone to a few Crossfit events, had the best new years ever on a secret island with all our friends, hung out on Martha’s Vineyard with my mom, spent a weekend in Boston, and NH, and a night in Santa Barbara–but none of those places felt like getaways really. They were either spent with family or places one of us had already been. There was no mutual discovery or exploring together. We never had that feeling that it was the two of us out in the middle of the world, far away from “real life.” (That’s a lie, I’ve felt that in his mom’s house and in my parents’ houses, but it’s still different.)

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We had to take a boat to get there!

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And it was crazy beautiful

So we’re doing a jam packed long weekend in both Portland and Seattle. We’re going to fly to Portland at 6:00 am on Friday, getting in around half 8 in the morning. We’ll spend all of Friday and Friday night in Portland, before eventually taking the train to Seattle, where we’ll spend Saturday night. We don’t fly out until Sunday at around 8 pm, so we’ll have a little more than a day in each city. Definitely a quick stop in each place, but we are happy to just stroll along the waterfront, have some delicious donuts, take a photo booth picture at the Ace, maybe go to the space needle, and definitely check out Powell’s Bookstore (but not spend the whole day there!). Also find as many happy hours as we can, obviously.

I’m SO excited. That we get to go somewhere neither of us has been. That I get him a day earlier and a day longer. That this four month (minus my last minute whirlwind bday trip) separation is finally over. We’ve done four months once before and it was horrible and I insisted we’d never do it again, but here we are. Thank god, almost on the other side of another one. But I mean it for real this time. Never again. It’s just too long.

Airline Miles – What I’m currently doing

As I’ve already posted about, I mainly fund my plane travel through airline miles. I took about a year off of actively trying to get miles, and was just basking in the glow of having accumulated 350,000+. Then the year passed and I continued to be in a long distance relationship, and suddenly my 350,000+ points were down to about 80,000. That’s only enough for one, MAYBE two if I’m really lucky, trips to see G. Or do anything else with my life, like maybe check off more of the countries on my list.

So I dove back in. It also helped that my coworker has gotten obsessed and is using me as a personal mileage guru. So here is what I’m currently doing to boost my miles back up. This should leave me with 155,000 miles by the time I’m done.

First, I signed up for the Citi Gold checking account. 50,000 miles for 1,000 spend over three months? Yes please! We sadly found out I’m targeted for this one, meaning not everyone can sign up just yet. BUT my coworker went in and it sounds like it’ll be open for everyone in April. It’s a great deal and I highly recommend (minus the fact that the checking account website is really ugly and I hate using it).

Then I did the Alaska Airlines card*, which I already wrote about. This was super easy, I closed it as soon as the miles posted to avoid the annual fee, and now I have 25,000 Alaska Airlines miles, which can be used on tons of different airlines, American included. (AND Alaska Air allows stop overs!!)

I just signed up for this, which is 35,000 after 3,000 of spend in three months. Unfortunately this offer has since ended and it’s back down to 25,000, which is still a pretty good deal. I’m using Plastiq to pay my rent, so that will be taken care of pretty quickly, thank you super expensive LA rental market! These points transfer to over 30 airlines, American and Alaska included. And for every 20,000 you transfer to Alaska, you get a 5,000 mile bonus! So I’m going to use the card until I have 40,000 miles, transfer to Alaska, and wind up with 50,000 miles!

Once I finish that off, I’m going to do the citi business, for that uh…. Etsy shop I’m going to open one day (that’s as solid as your business plans have to be to open a business card. Just don’t lie about it and you’re fine!). This is pretty straight forward and worth 30,000 for 1,000 in 90 days.

So, that’s that. The only card where I have to spend more than $1,000 in 90 days is the Starwood Preferred, and I’m using that to pay my rent. 155,000 miles, easy peasy.

*I just found out this card is churnable, meaning about 61 days after I canceled it, I was able to apply again. The deal has since changed and now it’s $1,000 of spend in 3 months, which I’m working on doing now.

European Roadtrip?

One of my favorite things to do is plan, in great detail, trips that I’m not actually going to take. Or, to be more accurate, not take in the immediate future. But I will do a RTW trip one day, and when that day comes I know my route and about how long I’ll stay where, and what will be flights and what will be ground transport. And it will be epic. That was what I spent most of my time doing during the hardest months of unemployment. Planning that RTW trip.

Now, with that very important task completed, I’ve moved on to a road trip around Europe. I roadtripped from Boston to Los Angeles in January of 2010 with my best friends from college, and it was one of my favorite life experiences. So when Gareth got a car last year, I started googling and realized just how tiny Europe actually is. It only takes two and a half hours to drive from Brussels to Amsterdam, or five and a half to drive from Berlin to Warsaw, for example.

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I don’t know exactly when this road trip will happen, but it’s definitely going to. I think it’ll be about two-two and a half weeks (though only 12 days with a car), and renting a car in Brussels and dropping it off in Tallin 12 days later is about $300.

I feel like that’s how much cars rent for in Los Angeles a day.* The ferry from Tallin to Helsinki is only 19 Euros, and there are flights back to London for as little as $80. This feels so doable and not very expensive, minus the fact that gas prices in Europe are crazy high.

Take a look!

Also as I was planning this I got more adventurous and look at this one! What a beauty! Though I can’t find anywhere that has online information about picking up a car in Calais or Brussels and dropping it off in Belgrade. Or even Budapest.

It’s not happening soon but that doesn’t matter in my crazy head. Planning, to me, is half the fun.

*This felt like a huge exaggeration but I just checked Enterprise and to rent a car from Friday-Monday is about $250!