Ring-tailed Lemur at Berenty Reserve

All About the Lemurs

As you all know, we spent Christmas at the Berenty Reserve in Androy, Madagascar. You can read about the logistics of such an adventure here, and see the photo diary of everything but the lemurs here. What you will find below are the best pictures and videos I got of all the different lemurs that live in Berenty. So without further ado, the highlight of the trip — the lemurs!

Sifakas Lemurs

These guys were so cute. They live in big groups (up to 13!) and can co-exist peacefully with other lemurs (though they do have certain territory, it can overlap). Sadly, all species of sifakas are threatened, ranging from vulnerable to critically endangered. When not stuffing their faces, which we saw quite a bit, they spend a good part of the day sunbathing, stretched on the branches.

Sifakas lemurs in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar Sifakas lemurs in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar      Sifakas lemurs in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar Sifaksa Lemurs in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar

We also saw these guys do a little dance to cross the road at one point, which was honestly so, so cool.

Ring-Tailed Lemurs

These guys were crazy friendly and brave. Though we commonly saw them out in the forest, there are also about 20 who live in the camp and hang out whilst you eat (and try very hard to steal your food). The ring-tailed lemur is highly social, living in groups of up to 30 individuals. It’s matriarchal, a trait common among lemurs. To keep warm and reaffirm social bonds, groups will huddle together. The ring-tailed lemur will also sunbathe, sitting upright facing its underside, with its thinner white fur towards the sun. Sadly, though they reproduce quite easily, they are also endangered due to habitat destruction and hunting for bush meat and the exotic pet trade. In 2017, it was estimated there are only about 2,000 left in the wild.

Ring-tailed Lemur at Berenty Reserve Ring-tailed Lemur at Berenty ReserveRing-Tailed lemurs in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar

Brown Lemurs

These guys are called the “common” brown lemur and while they were cute they were kind of overshadowed by the others, haha. Though the littler, darker one below was very frightened of this water and watching it muster the courage to drink was pretty adorable.

Brown lemurs in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar

Also this momma was carrying her baby in her mouth as it was too young to cling to her back.

White Footed Sportive Lemur in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar

White Footed Sportive Lemurs

These guys are nocturnal, though we spotted a few in the day. They cling to bush and are pretty difficult to spot. Mothers will live with the children and males live in solidarity but have territories that will overlap those of one or more females. They also eat their own feces, so that’s something.

White Footed Sportive Lemur in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar White Footed Sportive Lemur in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar

Gray Mouse Lemur

This teeny little lemur (it only weighs about 2 ounces) is ADORABLE. We only spotted them at night and it was hard to get a good picture, but doesn’t it look kind of like a non-creepy furbie? The gray mouse lemur and all other mouse lemurs are considered cryptic species, as they are nearly indistinguishable from each other by appearance. For this reason, the gray mouse lemur was considered the only mouse lemur species for decades until more recent studies began to distinguish between the species.Like all mouse lemurs, this species is nocturnal and arboreal. It is very active, and though it forages alone, groups of males and females form sleeping groups and share tree holes during the day.

Gray Mouse Lemur in Berenty Reserve, Madagascar

So I’m assuming you’re currently looking up flights to Madagascar to have your own experience in Berenty Reserve, no?

Honestly, what an incredible Christmas/life experience this was. I’ve seen the lemurs!

Leave a Reply